Ann Dewey’s financial planner, Timothy Bultman, referred her to his

 Ann Dewey’s financial planner, Timothy Bultman, referred her to his friend Robert Wilmot for estate-planning services. Wilmot did not know Dewey, her family situation, or anything about her affairs until they met. He drafted a will for her and named himself as personal representative. The will was silent as to Dewey’s intent—and, in no way, did the will indicate that Wilmot was her choice as personal representative. When Dewey died two years later, Wilmot offered the will for probate. Dewey’s three children objected to Wilmot’s appointment as personal representative, claiming that he had a conflict of interest. Wilmot asserted that Dewey had declined to name one of her children or a bank or other institution as her personal representative. Identify Wilmot’s “conflict of interest.” Was his conduct unethical? Explain. 

  

Miller, R.L., & W.E. Hollowell. (2013). Business law: Text & exercises (7th ed.). Cengage Learning ISBN-10: 1133625959; ISBN-13: 9781133625957

 

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